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Lake Yankton, Sd


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Chief White Crane State Recreation Area is at the Gavins Point Dam on the Missouri River. Nebraska is on the other end of the road over the dam.

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Reports Lake Yankton, SdLogin to Post   
 Date: 6/23/2012
Rating: Trip Rating
 Miles: 7.8Photos: 8 
(Chief White Crane Campground) Chief White Crane State Recreation Area is at the Gavins Point Dam on the Missouri River. Nebraska is on the other end of the road over the dam.

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quincypair on 8/9/2012 7:11pm
The cedar mentioned in the report is probably saltcedar Tamarix ramosissima, or chinensis, or parviflora, which is rapidly taking over some river systems. Doing an invasive plant pull today, the coordinator mentioned that the saltcedar, used as a windbreak in Alberta, is rapidly drying out river beds. This is of interest to the lower 48 including Florida. Introduced in the 1800's from southern Europe, eastern Mediterranean or Asia, it was used primarily for ornamental plantings, windbreaks and erosion control.
Saltcedar loves water; a single plant will consume about 200 gallons per day during its active growth -- a large stand can quickly deplete a river or creek. It seems to be a major threat to the South Platte in Colorado and also threatens the Colorado River, already stressed from lack of water. The plant also extrudes salt from its leaves which increases the salinity of the soil making it impossible for native plants to survive. In the South Dakota situation, cottonwoods were replaced by the saltcedar and only prolonged flooding of Lake Yankton killed the cedars,but not the cottonwoods. Apparently, according to a Florida source, one can over water saltcedar -- a curious anomaly.

Alberta Invasive Plants Council notes that "saltcedar has replaced large tracts of native cottonwoods/willow stands in the US and has lower wildlife value and greater water uptake than native tree stands."

The saltcedar has small pink to white flowers and can produce up to 1/2 million seeds per plant per year. It is deciduous and its leaves strongly resemble the cedar. It's sold in nurseries by the names of Pink Cascade and Summer Glow.

An example of what thirsty trees can do to rivers is the upper New River which quickly depletes of water when the river-side trees leaf out.


Location by quincypair, last updated on 8/9/2012.
It has been viewed 1136 times and has 2 posts.